Workshop on Ethics of Black Atlantic Masculinities on Display


Venue: McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture at College of the Holy Cross

Host: McFarland Center for Religion, Ethics and Culture

Description: Rethinking the Afropolitan: The Ethics of Black Atlantic Masculinities on Display

Each of the core themes animating this conference are broad. We challenge our participants and audience to historicize and complicate the idea and image of the Afropolitan and the controversies it has engendered. Our conceptualization of the Black Atlantic incorporates people of color and the range of communities they form among themselves and with others across the African, European, and American continents and the Caribbean. Masculinities also include women, third gender, sexualities, and trans- identities. Similarly, texts and histories are part of our understanding of visuality and the media. Indeed, the Afropolitan serves as the perfect invitation to think about this crossroads of history and visual culture because, increasingly, transnational historical actors, social movements, and the politics of identity profoundly shape what we research, what we write, and what we think that we see.

While this workshop aims to examine the intersections of gender, race, and visual culture, in the Atlantic world, from the sixteenth century to the present, we will consider proposals that also de-center the Atlantic by treating similar themes in or in relation to other regions such as the Mediterranean, Indian Ocean, or Pacific Ocean worlds. Funding is available to cover the travel and accommodations of those presenting at the workshop. One of our keynote speakers Silvio Torres-Saillant, Dean’s Professor in the Humanities, Syracuse University will be presenting his new work. We plan to publish selected papers as an edited volume or special issue of a journal.

Submit abstracts by April 1, 2017. For more details, see this CFP site.

Workshop Conveners: Rosa Carrasquillo, Associate Professor of History and Latin America & Latino Studies (rcarrasq@holycross.edu) and Lorelle Semley, Associate Professor of History and Africana Studies (lsemley@holycross.edu) both at College of the Holy Cross.

From Société des Ambianceurs et Personnes Elégantes (Hector Mediaville)

From Société des Ambianceurs et Personnes Elégantes (Hector Mediaville)